Dementia and intimacy

Many people, both women and men, as they grow older, experience decreased ability to participate in intimate relations with their partners.  Is this inevitable and unchanging? Not if the cause is the years of eating and drinking foods and beverages containing more than they tolerate of the aging chemicals. It is not inevitable if the nerves involved in intimacy have only been damaged and not destroyed by these chemicals. If these nerves are destroyed, lovemaking is not possible.

Some proof of this dependence on the nervous system is seen in surgeries to remove the cancerous prostrate gland. A certain percentage of of these surgeries can result in the loss of ability to engage in lovemaking.

If the nerves are still intact, even if damaged but not destroyed by surgery or the diet, there is a chance to again engage in intimate relations with your partner. Closely follow the diet as described in Retaining the Mind. As nerves heal very slowly, it may take 6 months, 1 year or 2 years to find out if this function can be regained.

May the diet restore you.

Our diet is making us old

When I see older people slowly, carefully, and with evident pain and distress feeling their way with a cane or walker, I say to myself, is this necessary? When I see older people arising from a chair slowly and carefully, with obvious pain and distress, I say to myself, is this necessary? If I asked a fellow observer why these people are suffering, she or  he might answer, “It is because they are old”. This explanation, while true, so often obscures another very real cause. Let me explain.

Each of us have two ages, chronological (years since birth) and ‘real’ age (how old our bodies and brains feel). People of the same chronological age can have a much younger ‘real’ age; they feel great. Others suffer a far older real age. Why do they feel more aged? You may already guess where I am going with this explanation of real age: ‘How our bodies and brains feel’. It is equivalent to to saying ‘how our nervous systems make us feel’. Or, stated another way, how much our nervous systems are punishing us. Why do they punish us? Because we have punished them for years, daily, and sometimes at every meal we eat during the day.

I know that no peer-reviewed study shows that our foods and beverages cause the tiredness, weakness, falling, body pains and all the other symptoms associated with the aging body. I do not think this can be studied, too many confounding variables. But my patients who followed the diet described in my book, Retaining the Mind often remarked on how much better they  felt, how their pains subsided, how their walking strengthened, how they felt less aged with a diet that avoided the foods and beverages that injure nerves.

You also may find relief from pain and discomfort by changing your diet.

It makes sense that changing the diet quiets many of the symptoms I mentioned above. Symptoms attributed to aging instead of the more important reason, damage to our nervous system through years of consuming the “aging chemicals”. Will everyone feel younger if they avoid the foods and beverages that contain high levels of these chemicals? No, that’s too much to hope for. But I firmly believe that many  women and men, some older and some younger, will find increased joy and comfort with the diet changes I advocate.  After all, does it make sense, as I point out in Retaining the Mind, to keep feeding people who suffer symptoms of nerve damage (such the debilities that accompany aging) a diet with high levels of nerve-damaging foods and beverages?

Perhaps the best way to summarize this message is to relate an experience. I had finished presenting my book to an audience that had received it well. As the room was already pledged to another group, a few of the audience and I recessed to the hall where we continued to talk about the foods that cause such great trouble. One man in our group, a man not old and in obvious great shape remarked, “When I eat sugary foods my whole body aches”. If sugar, one of the aging chemicals, causes a man in the prime of life such pain and discomfort, what is it doing to the aged?

Next time you see a person using a cane or walker, think to your self, “Is this necessary”? Next time you indulge in that sweet treat, think to yourself, “Is this necessary?”

Dementia affects all nerves

One unified system

The best known of the diseases that damage nerves in the brain is Alzheimer’s disease. But,  it is not the only dementia. Among other nerve-damaging diseases are vascular and frontotemporal dementias and the dementia associated with Parkinson’s disease. They can all degrade speech, thinking and purposeful activity. They are all horrendous and disabling,

 

We possess other nerves that are not in the brain: They also are susceptible to damage and death. They include nerves of the arms and legs with the nerves in the arms leading to muscle weakness in the muscles of the upper extremity.  The nerves to the legs are particularly susceptible to damage, resulting in the numbness and weakness of the feet and lower legs that destroys the sense of balance that these nerves provide, forcing the use of canes, walkers and wheelchairs. This nerve destruction in the legs is especially marked in people with pre-diabetes and diabetes and is considered a reason for diabetic lower extremity infections that sometimes lead to amputation.

 

The above list of nerve destruction in various body parts is nowhere near complete. However, I hope they give you the idea that when we discuss any particular disease, such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s dementias—or numb feet or stumbling—we are really discussing a wide-spread damage of the nervous system. I strongly believe that when a nerve disease, like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s diseases, or vascular or frontotemporal dementia, afflicts one part of our nervous system, in this case the brain, it is also affecting every other nerve in the body.

 

Comparing our nervous system to a tree may help you understand my point. The trunk of the tree is attached to all the leaves on the tree through the branches, even the smallest leaf on the branch at the greatest distance from the trunk. The tree is all one unit, an integrated whole. Our nervous system is like this tree, one unit, an integrated whole, with the brain attached to every nerve in the body, even the nerves furthest from it such as the nerves of the feet. Although we may notice disease in only one part of the nervous system, the whole nervous system is involved in disease.

 

My next blog and a request for help

In my next blog, I will return to this subject and discuss the reason for regarding the nervous system as a unified, integrated whole. In the meantime, help me spread the good news that dementia can be controlled and reversed. I know it can be reversed as I have experienced this reversal and want to help others to recover thought, speech and purposeful activity. If you are aware of a group that would profit from this news, please have them contact me through my website, www.drwwalsh.com.

This website also contains several other blogs and my speech that supplements the information in my book, Retaining the Mind.